Friday, June 4, 2010

Pirate Melissa part 2 UPDATE on Melissa Mergan

Someone asked where I originally acquired this info on Melissa Mergan. First, Melissa Mergan uploaded an eBook in her possession of which she is not the copyright owner to a file sharing site. It turns out that eBook contained her IP addy and name, which means she made that information on her available to the public.

It just so happens that someone in possession of that eBook sent out warnings of such and that one of those warnings landed in my email inbox along with permission to pass it on from the source who found it. No, I did not copy and paste, simply retyped the info of that IP addy and traced it, not a hard task, and found the matching name and other information via a very publically accessable resource.

So all in all, it turns out Melissa Mergan's unauthorized distribution of an eBook she is not the copyright owner of revealed her information to the public.

I just decided that since the pirates think it's okay to share what's they get access to that it's okay for me to do the same and share it here.

31 comments:

  1. "I just decided that since the pirates think it's okay to share what's they get access to that it's okay for me to do the same and share it here."

    This has to be the dumbest thing I have read all day. No matter how wrong piracy is, you should be ashamed of yourself to post someone's personal information. This type of situation can turn into a serious safety issue. Two wrongs don't make a right her buddy. Just makes you look like a vindictive asshole.

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  2. Really? Problem is, Leroy, I just garnered the information from Yahoo, Google and few other PUBLIC resources that already made the information available to the PUBLIC which does not violate Blogspot’s TOS.

    The pirates are distributing stolen property without owner consent and that IS a blatant violation of federal and copyright law.

    I'm posting what Yahoo, Google and a few other PUBLIC resources made PUBLIC when the information became available to them quite some time ago.

    If the pirates have no qualms posting an author's property without owner/author consent, why should I have qualms about posting the pirates’ ALREADY PUBLIC information here?

    Truth is, if I really wanted to be vindictive, I could post her EXACT home address, name of her parents, phone number and even date of birth. I think I’m being pretty considerate in keeping that private information—also found through Yahoo, Google and other PUBLIC sites—which is listed PUBLICALLY, off this blog.

    Now you tell me who is more considerate—a pirate who makes illegal copies of 1300 files and distributes said files publically or this vindictive asshole who keeps most of that pirate’s personal information hidden?

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  3. *snap* It looks like the waters are getting heated.......

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  4. Nope, not on this end. I'm still as cool as ever and the bomb of info I'm tossing from hand-to-hand in debate, makes me smile.

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  5. It seems Melissa Mergan is here as well:
    http://www.underground.mn/forumdisplay.php?f=18&order=desc&daysprune=-1&page=2

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  6. She's a thief and was caught for it. Killers and bank robbers get their names posted in the newspaper in the stories of their crimes. Child molesters are made register in a public database and notify their neighbors. There should be a public registry of pirates as well. Don't do the crime if you don't want people looking at you like you're scum. You want to be an active thief--you take the risk.

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  7. Anybody who would call you a vindictive asshole and use the old 'two wrongs don't make a right' is ridiculous. Everybody who decides to be a pirate needs to be exposed. 'Leroy' seems to be very sympathetic to the pirates, which doesn't look good for 'him'. Funny how these people love to wallow in the depths of anonymity so they can cost writers money and be as nasty as they please to those who bring it to light - using pseudonyms to protect themselves. If you're not doing anything wrong, you wouldn't need to be so protective.

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  8. Poor Melissa...some author wasn't very nice...blah blah blah...I believe none of this would have happened had she
    a) not pirated books that don't belong to her
    b) taken the threat in writing from a publisher seriously - and not taken it to the forum. Thieves are dishonest people and she was the one who posted the info about her name being embedded on the book she posted to the board.
    Note: it's called The WORLD WIDE WEB for a reason.
    She obviously did not even open the book, much less read it. She bought it and quite proudly posted it to the world to upload for free.
    Fate?

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  9. Hey, Melissa, I truly meant that when you prove to me you have removed all your links that I would remove your info from here. The sad part is that you have taken on a new 'name' and are back in the game. How much more of your info shall I release? Guess what? I'm releasing ALL of it to the PA Attorney General Tom Corbin.

    And for those who were asking, yes, the internal IP addy of the computer you are on cannot be hidden...even if you are in a dorm with 5000 people, all sharing an internet connection and all having their own computer, the IP address can easily be narrowed down to an individual computer.

    Oh, and do you have any idea how easy it is to put a backdoor virus on whatever file a programmer wants so they can tap into your personal computer? Do you know what identifies a simple backdoor program on your computer? How about a complicated one?

    I love outing secrets, but I'll keep those last ones as all mine.

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  10. Funny how Anon on June 7 @ 9:35am scolds pirates & posters for "using pseudonyms to protect themselves" while going Anon him/herself! Hypocrite much?

    And, hello, this blog is *run* anonymously, so until the big, bad pirate fighter reveals their true identity, why should everyone else here?

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  11. In the same manner most places allow one to post comments and files without revealing their name, so do I allow the same here. I do so because I know without a doubt that each and every one of you pirates would destroy the careers and viciously attack any who said a single word against you.

    Don’t pull that bull about pirating helping authors, that’s a crock and you know it. Oh and as for the muck of eBooks aren’t books, then why is the word eBook acknowledged by many legal sources? And the you don’t read or are just passing it on, right, then why are you in such a tizzy over being outed?

    I’ve already been cussed at, called names, chastised several times and accused of posting private information—guess again. If what I find is previously published information publically accessible without cost or hard work, where am I posting anything private?

    I know each and every poster because those posters do give me their names so I can verify the given info, I’ll bet not a pirate on Asta or other such upload/download sites gives their name for fear of legal retaliation, do they?

    Want my name? Permanently shut down the pirating and illegal file sharing of copyright protected material on all the cyberwounds bleeding authors and I’ll give you my name.

    Until then, deal with this blog.

    And thanks for amping up my determination to find another pirate to chew on.

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  12. And thank YOU for amping up many pirates' determination to keep sharing files no matter what you do. Thanks to you, I now know about proxy servers, virtual private networks, how to be careful about opening up pdfs in browsers and how to strip IP identifiers off ebooks I buy. I had *no clue* about any of that until you started naming names and we started sharing how to protect ourselves with one another. You could have just contacted the pirates' ISPs or law enforcement in their states and taken them out quickly and quietly. But because you clearly want adulation from other authors (no way in hell you are ever convincing me you're not one - I even have you narrowed down to a few possibilities based on your writing style and vocabulary) - you just *had* to tell how you did it, and helpfully showed us what we need to avoid revealing from now on. You have made martyrs out of a couple of people, a fine short-term showing, but I promise you a year from now you will have made no lasting reduction in sharing, only smarter pirates. Ebook sharing is really just starting to takeoff...

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  13. You have me smiling, but I’m not the one instructing on how to remove such and an IP address isn’t something you can completely change or even hide as it will always end up leading to a specific location, just like any physical address.

    Let me give you a few pointers you overlooked in your enthusiasm.

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  14. 1-This is the most important point of all, EACH AND EVERY COMPUTER HAS AN IP ADDRESS AND ANYTIME YOU ARE ON THE INTERNET, YOUR IP ADDRESS IS REVEALED, CAPTURED AND TRACEABLE. There is no way around this because the transfer of information between computers requires an IP address.
    Think of it like this, the post office cannot get a letter from a sender—host computer/server—to a recipient—you/user—without knowing the exact location—city/state/zip/country/call it what you will—of where the letter goes.
    Here’s another idea, the phone company cannot get a phone call from a dialer—host computer/server—to a receiver—you/user—without knowing the exact location—city/state/zip/country/call it what you will—of what phone the call goes to.
    Just as the sending of a letter or making of a phone call between people requires a physical address or phone number location, so does the sending computer—server—need an IP addy to send the information to the receiving computer—user.
    When you request a webpage, your ISP has to know where to send the webpage information and therefore has to access the IP address of the requesting computer, aka, the user—you.
    That information in cyberspace is not simply floating around, but is on various host computers—servers—ones you have to access to see, read, hear or anything else while on the internet—play games, access email, download, upload—you get the idea.
    As I said, any computer accessing the internet has an IP address because an IP address is how another computer knows where to send the information the user wants and anytime your computer is on the internet, its IP address is revealed, captured and traceable.
    Yes, you can delete your computer’s history, but how are you going to delete history of the server? While shutting down a computer might stop the immediate transmission of the IP addy, the next time the computer is on and accesses the internet, the IP addy is revealed, captured and traceable.

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  15. 2-Most places that offer public use of computers or internet access do NOT allow certain activities or websites. Those businesses protect themselves as they do not want charged for facilitating the transfer of illegal material, to include copyright protected works.
    Such is why places like 4shared removes your files when requested by the person who can show they are the copyright owner and quite often releases your information, including your name, address and IP addy, to the copyright owner as it is their legal responsibility to do so—read their TOS.

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  16. 3-Proxy Servers do NOT hide an IP address, but allow a user to bypass things like a server’s firewall. A proxy server acts as a redirector, standing between the server and user to give a false sense to the server of who is accessing because the user is usually not supposed to access said server and the proxy is usually trusted.
    What you may not realize is the Proxy logs its IP addy with the server and then logs the user’s IP addy to facilitate the transfer of information. This means there is a log connecting the user to the server.
    Some ISPs or workplace servers inhibit access to certain sites in the same manner a Nanny program does a child’s computer. While a Nanny program works from the computer in the home, ISPs and workplace servers work from mainframes.
    While a Nanny program usually prevents a child’s computer from reaching a proxy server, computers not individually protected by such programs allow anyone to bypass most protective measures and access places like Asta and Underground. An office worker can have a proxy server bypass a work server, but it is not untraceable.
    Are your sure that adult eBook you made available is not being downloaded by a minor and that you are not contributing to a child who managed to get an account on some communication hub like Asta?
    Look at little Melissa—claiming across the net she’s a teenager and can’t be touched—she has all sorts of access to adult material, compliments of Asta and another communication hub and those who upload. Her parents problem? Maybe. But at the same time, her using a proxy puts the proxy server on the line as well as the server and the uploaders for facilitating the transfer of copyright protected material.
    BTW, because the ISP is in Melissa’s name, I doubt she’s a minor.

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  17. 4-Virtual Private Networks, aka VPNs, do NOT hide an IP address. A VPN condenses data transfers between networked devices.
    A VPN allows remote users secure access to their organization's network and ONLY THAT organization's network. The maintained privacy for security procedures is only good WITHIN the walls of the company using it.
    The pirate sites are NOT companies and I doubt they would even tread that ground as declaring they are another hub—such as Napster was—will not go over well without someone making some money somewhere.
    I also doubt all those on pirate sites are linked via more than a communication hub—again, Astatalk, Underground and Demonoid are communication hubs. A VPN uses PUBLIC telecommunication infrastructures—aka, the internet.
    I don’t think the pirating hubs have the financial capability to install and maintain a VPN, nor that all the members would want to either A-contribute or B-reveal their information on their computer.
    Remember, Napster was a communication hub and those logs went to court.

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  18. 5-Unless the involved computers are networked outside of the internet on a LAN—means connecting directly computer to computer to cut the need for the internet—you still have to use the internet to transfer—upload, download, data, files, email, games.

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  19. 6-Any transfer of information or stream of data—uploading and downloading is exactly that—can pick up cyberbugs while that a data stream is flowing. Such can and often does include a virus. Triojans and worms have a knack for slipping past virus scanners. The Bagel was a worm and transferred via downloads and email while Conficker was a worm and transferred via redirecting.

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  20. As I said, unless all involved computers and locations are linked outside of the internet, your IP addy will be revealed and that means some computer somewhere can capture it and once captured, it can be traced.

    As for opening PDFs in browsers and stripping IP identifiers from eBooks, think again. I didn’t tell you anything about how to do that, but Adbit, an Atsta mod, did and you just confirmed it as such information was not available on this site prior to this moment.

    Adbit is a moderator, meaning Astatalk officially placed Adbit in that leadership position in some manner and has not reprimanded or removed Adbit from that position for revealing such information—and now it’s too late to do so.
    That means Astatalk officially knows that piracy is going on and such puts every mod on Astatalk responsible for facilitating the transfer of copyright protected material—pirating, file sharing, call it what you will.
    Basically, when some lawyer goes after the owner/founder of Astatalk, said lawyer can also pursue the mods because every Astatalk mod knows piracy is happening and is equally responsible for facilitating the transfer of copyright protected material.

    —begin info—

    http://astatalk.com/profile/18885/adbit/

    Here's an idea of the info posted on Asta …(and yes, I retyped every word instead of C&P)
    Status Actions
    Adbit - 09 Feb 2010 - Owner/Creator
    Alewan2010- 24 Feb 2010 - Member
    Hackerheart - 01 Mar 2010 - Moderator
    Adiroxxx - 06 Mar 2010 - Member
    Nayann - 10 Mar 2010 - Member
    red88 - 18 Mar 2010 - Member
    Crowster - 28 Mar 2010 - Member
    sisco2901 - 04 Apr 2010 - Moderator
    Ashok.poonia - 05 Apr 2010 - Member
    DXGen - 26 Apr 2010 - Member
    peanut1983 - 16 May 2010 - Member
    Vaspo - 25 May 2010 - Member

    —end info—

    Trust me, I’m sending what I have to a pirate’s ISP and law enforcement in their state. The trick to any lawsuit is gathering enough evidence to be unshakable in court. Jumping too soon is a fool’s mistake. Wouldn’t it be amusing if I had this running via a proxy to capture the IPs that comment here?

    I don’t want any adulation from other authors. I do this because I want to, because I don’t like thieves, because I sure as blazes don’t want to teach any child to steal in any form or to distribute or sell stolen property.

    If you truly think I am an author and that you have me narrowed down to a few possibilities based on my writing style and vocabulary, you might want to reassess your information. Or reveal if you think you know so much. Would I deny who I really am? No. You out me and I’ll happily admit it—IF and only IF—you are correct. That’s more than I can say for some of you pirates.

    Truth is, I didn’t tell much of anything except searching public information channels, something anyone can do with just common sense. And if I showed you what to avoid revealing from now on, I hope that means you have stopped your illegal uploads and downloads, otherwise, you have learned nothing.

    Since the future is never written, we’ll see what a year from now holds. Remember, the law is going after uploaders and downloders.

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  21. For such a verbose writer you are a terrible reader. I never said that you taught me those things, I said "thanks to you" I now know them. There's a big difference. Your actions on this blog got the ball rolling at Astatalk and other sites for us to share ways to protect ourselves - you did not provide the info, but you provided the impetus for it to be discussed and disseminated. So I now know lots of stuff I wasn't aware of - before you - and feel much safer. Clearly I didn't learn the lesson you wanted me to, but that doesn't mean I've learned *nothing*.

    I'm not going to argue about all the technical stuff, just tell us when you've managed to ID a pirate who hides using one of the methods that you say won't work. Then I'll be impressed. If you come across an IP address from Las Vegas, that might be me. Feel free to post it, because that's my VPN talking - I actually live almost 1,000 miles away.

    I have no interest in outing you, I'm just having fun pondering the possibilities. I was discussing this with a friend and she has completely different guesses than I do as to who you are, so maybe I'm not such a great style sleuth at all. But basically, I figure you have your reasons to be anonymous, and I for one have no problem with that.

    And, no, I have not stopped sharing files, and won't. Like I said, all you've done is scare a few people but made scores more very annoyed. You've knocked out a couple of Goliaths (or maybe not, since you say at least one of them is still at it, oops!) but there are lots of little people left to take up the slack. I went looking for 5 recent releases on Asta today and they are all there, and were put up after you started this campaign. So, yeah, we don't know the future, but since music is still very heavily shared despite full-blown legal action, I don't see ebooks being much different.

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  22. Actually, I read quite well, research thoroughly, too. My words were —quote—You have me smiling, but I’m not the one instructing—end quote—
    Yes, I was amused by your words and wanted to make sure it was clear that I never taught any instruction of that type on this site.

    So breaking the law doesn’t bother you?

    Interesting. I guess burglar, carjacker or ID thief wouldn’t faze you either?
    Apparently you failed to recall the most vital fact…when on the internet, your IP is revealed, captured and traceable…and it dones’t matter where you are as VPNs don’t hide IP addresses when you go outside of the company.


    You consider Melissa a Goliath? Yes, at it until the PA AG gets through with her.

    Please do reveal more.

    Music upload/download is taking its toll because it’s appearing in court more. You never know what may happen if authors and/or publishers ban together.

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  23. The PA AG Tom Corbett has been send a list of information.

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  24. I stand corrected on an earlier post as the ID I mentioned was not Melissa's, but another pirated outed earlier this year. Thank you, friend, for correcting my error.

    Melissa Mergan's new Asta ID is Arctica 86.

    Melissa, I'm not going to tell you what you keep doing to let me know what your ID is, but please know, your attempt to hide behind a new name is pathetic.

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  25. I'm just curious about your opinion on the selling of used books to sellers on Amazon. Is that worse than piracy, since they are selling your copyrighted material for a personal profit? Have you gone after any of those sellers?

    Honestly, I just don't understand the difference.

    I would also like to know why ebooks cost as much as they do, as the publishers do not incur the cost of paper, ink, or printing.

    Thanks

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  26. My stance depends on HOW you are selling.

    Is what you are selling a physical book that you can hold in your hand as a solid item? If yes, then once you sell and physically ship that solid item, it leaves your possession and can no longer be in your possession unless you buy it back. This means there is no copy made and the original item is sold or given away.

    Is what you are selling is an e-book that can only be read while opened by an electronic device? If yes, then it really depends on if that e-book is still in your possession after you close the sale and the other person receives it. If you right click and make a copy, you are committing copyright infringement and the sale of said copy is NOT legal.

    If at any time you send something via e-mail or file transfer and it is a copy of something that you did not write yourself, you are committing copyright infringement and the transfer of said copy is illegal.

    If you are making copies of an e-book you bought, you are committing copyright infringement. If you are giving away or selling those copies, you are distributing or selling stolen goods.

    Think of it this way, making copies of an e-book to sell or give away is just as illegal as making copies of the latest Stephen King hardback to sell or give away.

    I hear a lot of people saying that copies are not illegal, that it's just making a copy to share. Yeah, right. If it’s legal to make a copy of anything to share, then it would be legal to make a copy of Stephen King's latest best-selling novel or the newest 2010 Mustang for the same purposes.

    Making copies of an e-book is as illegal as making a copy of a paperback novel or a car—let’s see you right click and copy that car or even that book without a scanner!

    Is it legal to make a copy of Stephen King’s latest best-selling book or the latest 2010 Mustang and sell that copy? No. Honestly, since you can’t right click and make a second car appear, you shouldn’t be able to do such to an eBook and give or sell it either.

    If you treat the eBook in your possession like a paper book, like a car, like any physical object, and it leaves you possession when you sell it and you no longer have ANY access to it, then you’re legal. However, if you right click or make a copy to sell, you are selling stolen goods, and if you give it away, you’re distributing stolen goods.

    And it’s not my copyrighted material.

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  27. As for the cost of eBooks, I think I once answered that—overhead. In all honesty, I don’t think $2.99 is expensive for a 69-page, 14,000-word story or $4.99 for a 150 page, 50,000-word story.

    Overall, I don’t find that expensive. If you’re talking about Amazon, I don’t buy from them because of their price as the publisher sites are cheaper.

    No, e-publishers don’t suffer paper, ink, or printing costs, but do suffer similar expenses.

    Space. Physical pubs endure physical buildings while e-Pubs endure hosting costs. Not all e-Pubs own their own host site any more than all physical pubs own their own building. Those who don’t own, rent: for some it’s a building, for others it’s web space.

    Advertising. Advertisement in either the physical world or cyber space still has a price tag and all pubs, e- or physical, have to pay for advertising.

    Staff. All publishers in the physical and cyber realms have staff, be they CEOs, EICs, editors, artists, accountants, and more, there are staff that are entitled to pay. Hey, if you’ve never built, designed, or paid for a website, look into it, you might be surprised and don’t go thinking it’s easy to create and routinely update one because it’s not as easy or cheap as you think.

    Utilities. Whether cyber or physical, there are things needs to run a company, any company. These things are electric, phone, computers, and more.

    And that’s just the basics.

    I find most e-pubs are reasonable in price. Granted the incoming NY pubs may be under the impression that because they are NY they can charge more, but that’s up to them and it up to readers to let them know the prices are too high.

    Take your favorite book and then decide if you think the price charged was fair to you and if what you think you should have paid is fair to the author for the work put into it.

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  28. Do you have kids? Brothers, sisters, cousins? Then i suggest you post their IPs and personal information online as well becos I can bet the bank that almost, if not, all of them have and still do, download music, books and other stuff... and also SHARE what they have with other people online. You chatter on about piracy and revealing criminals even when deep down you know that most of them are just regular people sharing what they have with others of similar interest. If you REALLY wanted to make a difference and were not just being the self righteous p@#%k that your earlier posts portray you'd be lobbying to have all shareware sites shutdown. But you just derive insane pleasure from putting people in physical danger. And if perchance one of your "pirates" is attacked and brutally injured or worse by some psycho I am 100% sure you'll come up with a quirky line to vindicate yourself of any involvement when in truth you should be held accountable as a accessory. And bare in mind....... if you can find them... they can find you too!!! All the tech stuff is useless if someone who REALLY knows how to wants to find you; you have YOUR personal info online as well. Just saying.... If YouDoWhyCan'tThey? Have a cracking great day.. and don't piss off any psychotic hackers.

    P.S. An even simpler solution... If you don't want your books circulated online then DO NOT PUT THEM THERE! Stop selling ebooks and ebook piracy ceases to exist. Go figure.

    P.S.S. This is not a threat or anything like that. Just clear thinking and basic common sense.

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  29. You are wrong, very wrong. I monitor the computers in MY house and NO, those in MY house do NOT and never have downloaded music, books or other stuff because they know my stance, because they know how they, as well as I, were burned by an act of piracy. And NO, they do NOT share unless the item leaves their possession. My children were taught that sharing meant letting the other person have equal time/use. My children were also taught as much of the law as I could teach, to include that taking/giving of someone else’s property without permission is stealing and punishable by law.
    I do lobby, when and where I can and in any way that I can that helps fight pirates.
    You do seem to have shareware sites confused with pirate sites.
    Shareware means it’s there for a set type of use for the duration of time the legal copyright owner decides and as long you stay with the confines of any user end agreement.
    Freeware means it’s free to do with whatever you want to as long you stay with the confines of any user end agreement.
    I have put no one in danger and derive nothing by revealing what any simpleton with a computer can find. Try it, you might be surprised by what you find. Make sure to search out yourself, then try a family member or friend. You apparently have no idea just how much of your so-called private information is listed PUBLICALLY in the search engines and is easily accessible without a fee.
    They are not my pirates, perhaps yours, but not mine. If anyone is attacked, you would have to be sure the only place the info could come from was this blog. However, since the info was already listed in the PUBLIC records of Yahoo and Google and several other PUBLIC places available to the GENERAL PUBLIC, I doubt I could be the sole culprit, especially since I did not commit the act. I don’t know how many times I have to state that same silly public fact before it sinks it.
    Since anyone with a computer can locate the same info I do, who’s to say the info came from only my site? Since I didn’t physically commit the act, didn’t provide any physical item for the act and did not instruct anyone to commit any act, how am responsible for the attack?
    There are those in the world who pick up cigarettes and once addicted want to sue the tobacco companies for making them smoke. Or perhaps were injured by a weapon, took a bullet to the thigh and plan to sue the weapon company for someone pulling the trigger. Maybe an auto accident and the auto manufacturer is the target.
    Either or, get real.

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  30. We are all responsible for our actions. My action was creating this blog. Thousands of people out there have blogs and many of them reveal some wonderful things, too. We are all responsible for our words. I just copy and paste what I find on Yahoo and Google when locating a pirate.
    According to Yahoo and Google, if you don’t want your info out there, it is the responsibility of the info’s owner to take action to get it removed. I guess that means I can only find what one leaves for me.
    Everyone is responsible for their own actions. If you drink and drive and cause an accident, who made you drink and drive? You did. If you shoot someone, who made you do it? You did. If you smoke and get addicted, who made you do it? You did. While I post the information any simpleton can access via Google and Yahoo, I am not the one who physically hunted down the pirate and did injury nor did I encourage any such act via my blog. If I stand accountable, then so does Google and Yahoo and several others as well as the ISPs who make the information exist in the first place and make it available to the general public where anyone can access it for free and with ease. BTW, such a case would also mean a gun manufacturer is responsible for a shooting and an auto manufacturer is responsible for an auto accident and a pharmaceutical company…well, you get the idea. Come on.
    Yes, I can be found, too, and you are welcome to do so. I have already said that if someone can locate me, I will congratulate them, announce my defeat and shut down this blog. There is no tech stuff shielding me and yes, Google and Yahoo have my info as well as yours and anyone else’s on the net.
    By the tone of your email, I think I already upset you, but to keep it straight, 1-I am not revealing anything that is not already public , 2-I am not encouraging anyone to take any actions except to cease pirating (such an act would get a pirate’s info removed) and most importantly, 3-I am not bullying anyone either.
    Like I said, I am not an author.
    An even simpler solution would be for people to abide by the law and respect the author by not pirating. Then again, I guess pirates were never taught the meaning and idea of respect.
    And nothing on my site is a threat or revelation of anything not already listed in public records nor is it designed to instigate anyone to go hunting.
    What impresses me is most of the lashing out on this blog comes from the pirates or those on the side of the pirates because I reveal their already-public information while the authors, who are hurt the most by the pirates, are predominately the quiet ones, the ones who speak softly, who rail least and who are being stolen from.
    And the stop circulating eBooks to prevent them from being pirated is like saying stop owning anything if you don’t want it stolen. What will be your reaction when your car or home is broken into?

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